Archive for the ‘#systematicapproach’ Tag

Like the First Day of School…..   2 comments

“Alright, let’s get started”, someone with authority barks, but I’m already seated up toward the front.  “How did I get here?”, I muse as I realize I am front and center.  I quickly scoot myself back toward a wall during the confusion of folks jockeying for chairs and finding their comfy places.  Our manager welcomes everyone and decides we should do introductions as there’s new faces in the crowd.  There’s always new faces, where do these folks come from?

Oldest guy in the room.

The guy with a beard to my right starts, “I’m so and so and this is my second year”, then it’s the other guy with a beard, “I’m so and so, and this is my first year, then it’s the fresh faced young woman, “I’m so and so, this is my first year.  Uh-oh, my turn, “I’m Duane, ah this is my first year.”  That gets a laughing response from the masses, because they all know I’m the old guy.  The roll-call continues and the bearded guys keep rolling out low numbers of years with guiding experience.  I’m amazed.  Yea, there’s a few with eight or nine years in the room (one that says he shadowed me 8 or 9 years ago), but for the most part these folks are young enough to be my kids.  Hell, some of them might be.

It’s like going to a professional baseball game and realizing that the damn umpires are younger than you. I’m the oldest in the room again, and after some health issues last winter, I’m beginning to feel it.  Don’t get me wrong, I can hang with these kids all day everyday, it’s just that when I grow a beard, it’s gray.  That just doesn’t look cool in a fly shop or magazine cover anymore.  I’m a relic, and my fly choices and approach to the sport show it.  I still throw tons of soft-hackles and my idea of lunch is sandwiches on the way to the river so we have optimal time to fish.  Although I still throw softies, I have had to learn that guide trip lunch is something you do sitting down next to the river after you have thoroughly washed your hands with that new antibacterial liquid soap.  Isn’t all soap antibacterial?

I digress.  As the paper stack grows at my feet, I wonder how many old permits are in my pack.  Not too long ago, I was stopped by a game warden and checked for a license.  I found one in there from 2007, I really need to get in there and clean my pack out.  Might be a sandwich in there.  The manager explains how to carry these in a water-proof bag in your waist pack (no vest wearers in this room, not since I switched 5 years ago.), and I watch as some folks jot down this information, and the most of the rest are nodding their heads in agreement.  I think, “You gotta be told how to carry this stuff?”. Then, I kick myself for being “that old guy”, and find myself nodding with the rest.

I’m asked to get up and describe the areas we can legally guide on the South Platte River near Deckers.  I get up and in a nice way tell them it is their responsibility to learn where they can and can’t fish.  I go into how one winter, I walked the entire blue line from the confluence up to the fly shop, and drew a map showing every feature I thought important.  I realize at this time that I wasn’t asked to tell them to learn it themselves, so I explain that we can meet down there and do a drive-a-long.  Old guy relinquishes again, but it’s worth it.

I also throw in that there are a million first year guides out there, but not nearly as many second year guides.  In other words, don’t be a jerk, keep your head down, and bust your ass.  As the meeting comes to a close, I think about how these guide meetings are just like the first day of school.  A good chance to meet new people, rekindle old friendships, discern a pecking order, and fill out a pile of paperwork.  Just before the meeting was adjourned I got “it”.  I got that old feeling that I used to get before a guide trip, or when geese were set and coming in to my decoys. or before a big baseball game.  I got a butterfly.  Only one, but it was a good one.  I’m excited for another year on the river. I look for the challenges, and am stoked about working with all of the guides, management, and ownership.  Here we go.

Fear No Water

p.s. Buy a copy of The Fly Fishers Playbook for the old guy in your life for Father’s Day

Oh, I see……   4 comments

Hidy Ho Good Neighbors!

Wow, been too long since I last posted, but I’ve been a busy dude.  Just spent the last eight to ten weeks cranking out the text for my next book project.  I’m really fired up about this book, and am looking for an on the shelf date of late 2017.  The text is done except for countless edits, but that’s never been the hard part for me.  The hard part is all of the charts, graphs, illustrations and pictures.  Going to rely on some talented friends to help out with all of that.  Speaking of friends, I asked four from around the country, at various stages of their perspective fishing careers to read and edit for flow, content, etc.  I really appreciate their help, and they will have special mention in the book.

First book was out on June of 2011, second came out in December 2014, this one hopefully, in December 2017.  Notice a pattern there?  What it tells me is that it takes me about three years to learn enough new stuff to be able to write another book.  That’s thousands of hours of on the water observations, note taking, and data collection.  I was on the river yesterday and someone shouted to me the river temperature, and I honestly didn’t care.  Oh, I will in a couple of weeks when the Blue Wings start popping, but yesterday was a diversion from the book day, so I simply nodded it off.

I am still amazed at what I glean from simple water time in a relatively short time.  It shows I’m paying attention AND there’s still more to learn!  A lot more!  This next book uses statistical information from hours and hours of dedicated note taking to flesh out the best techniques and flies to use as you progress on your fly fishing journey.  It’s going to be roughly 55,000 words, plenty of illustrations and pictures should round it out.  This years presentation is called Hidden In Plain View, and folks across the country seem to like it.  The presentation mirrors the book as it gets into being able to recognize the obvious and exploit the obscure in fly fishing.  It should have something for every level angler, and covers tactics from mini/skinny, double dry fly, nymphing, and streamer work.  Crazy fun.

So, with all that going on, I haven’t had much time to work on my annual winter technique.  Most that have followed for a while will recall that I pick something to work on every winter during slack times in the season.  This year, I decided to continue what I was working on last winter and last 2 years guiding seasons.  I’ve been working on this covertly, simply because I didn’t feel as if it was ready to unveil.  It’s no mind blasting technique, but I wanted to have the specifics dialed in before telling anyone about it.  In the last three years I have begun to use “sighter” leaders in my suspended or hinged nymph rigs.  A sighter leader allows the angler many benefits, but mostly for this indicator fishing it helps detect very subtle eats, and it gives you a great idea of what your rig is doing sub-surface in relation to your indicator.  It’s a specialized leader I build using various poundages and colors of amnesia and monofilament lines.  A few of the knot tags are left un-trimmed and further the sight capabilities.

Many anglers don’t even realize what is going on sub-surface in regards to the indicator.  We are so dialed into surface mending, that we don’t think about subsurface mending.  We can see what is going on surface wise because of our fly line, but it’s often difficult to discern what is going on below the indicator.  The sighter leader fixes that because it will clue you in as to when your leader turns over the indicator, and where your flies are at pretty much anytime within the drift.  This has been a huge help to many of my clients as they begin to see how a few specialty mends can effect the entire sub-surface drift.    They then can learn and employ a pile, stack, or pause mend with great effectiveness and confidence, because the results are observable through the sighter.

Here’s the formula for one of my leaders, this is all you get til the book comes out!  Try this, I think you’ll like it:

36″- 20 pound Yellow Amnesia

30″ – 14 pound clear Monofilament

24″ – 10 pound Red Amnesia

Connect everything with a blood knot, and if you wish use a tippet ring at the end of the 10 pound red amnesia, it’s a fine idea.  From the tippet ring attach your 16″ of 4x, 5x, or whatever mono or flouro to your first fly. You can place your split shot above the tippet ring to complete your in-line nymph rig.

Upstream sighter leader work. Photo James Durden.

 

 

I was fishing this rig just yesterday and noticed and set on the sighter movement more than a few times.  The indicator never even twitched.  It does take a bit of practice to use the sighter because it forces you to keep the indicator in your peripheral vision and use it as a secondary device.  This just adds to your angling versatility as you begin to fish the entire vicinity around the nymph rig.

Anyway, enough for now.  I’ll be better with more consistent posts.  Til then, get out and fish the sighter.

Fear No Water!

Notice the blood knot tag location…mono to red amnesia line.

Hell or High water….   Leave a comment

Hidy ho Good Neighbors!

High water and run-off close a few opportunities for fly fishing moving water, but opens up the chances of fly fishing still waters.  I grew up on mountain lakes and fly fishing still waters.  I absolutely love it and always look forward to fishing and guiding the glass.

Back in May I took a trip to Arizona to present to a few clubs (Arizona Fly casters and Desert Fly casters) the Systematic Approach to Fly Fishing.  Some of you may not know that I am originally from AZ and remember the fly fishing more than I remembered the heat.  One hundred eight degrees in Phoenix one day!  So, I was overjoyed to travel up to the White Mountains, where I cut my fly fishing teeth on lakes, for a bit of lake fly fishing.

We arrived at Becker Lake, near Springerville, AZ, at around noon. The boys (Gentry, Joe, and John), were gracious enough to outfit me with a pontoon, booties, and fins.  I was fixated on dry fly fishing first, running streamers secondly, and nymphing as a last option.  Not that I don’t make a living fishing under a bobber or I have anything against it, but I wanted dry fly or streamer action, because I don’t get to do too much of that. I can never get too much of that!

Well, there were very few fish eating on the surface.  I could see size 18 chironomid adults sporadically hatching, but couldn’t raise a fish.  After about an hour of that, I switched to a tandem streamer rig.  I threw a black slumpbuster on a jig hook in front of John Rohmer’s simi leech (black and olive).  No love on that rig either.  I could see the writing on the wall, nymphing time.

Now these guys are running 18’ leaders and break-away indicators, with trolling motors and fish finders.  Pretty serious individuals.  I thought I knew how to rig a break away indicator, and had picked up a few before leaving Colorado. I couldn’t find the dang things in my waist pack, and finally asked for help getting that thing rigged.  I put on as close to matching bugs with what I could glean from the few guys that were hooking up, but soon realized that my formula left much to luck.  Soon, I took off the indicator, loaded up weight and fished it “Czech-style” right on the bottom.  I did have a couple eats, which I completely missed, but I did move fish.

Mercifully, the wind got big, and I got to cruise to the dock.  Not that I didn’t have fun, but I always like to feel I’m in at least a smidge of control.  I met my nephew on the way to the evening’s festivities as I cruised back toward Pinetop, and watched him fish for Apache and brown trout on a small stream that I don’t know the name of.  He moved more than a few on dry dropper rigs. I felt a little better.

That evening, as I lay there listening to my brothers dog snoring, I realized I needed to fish to my strengths tomorrow on that lake.  The White Mountain Lakes Foundation was hosting an annual event that raises money for the organization, which in turn, helps the organization support and enhance the fishing in the White Mountains. I was honored to be a part of it.  I was up early the next morning, drinking a cup of coffee and puffing my pipe, in front of a 7-Eleven, rigging a double dry rig consisting of a Royal Wolff followed by and adult chironomid pattern matching the adults I saw earlier.  My plan was to go back to my roots and walk the edges early morning looking for and casting to rings and noses.

I had just thrown on my waders, when a gentleman named Mike came up to me and Gentry and said, “There are fish coming up on the far end”.  “Where abouts?”, I asked. He pointed to a spot that was maybe a five minute walk.  I was there in four.

I stood for a moment watching the action and planning on how to fish to these noses from near to far, trying not to spook them.  First cast….bam, fish on!  What? Tiger trout? “Oh this is even gonna be better than I thought”, I mumbled, as another fish ate my second cast.  Mike had put me on a pod of small tiger trout on the munch.  He eventually showed up, and I thanked him for the intel again.  We both moved a few more (I snapped of a big one) and then it was time to head back for more festivities.

High river water offers the opportunity to seek out still water.  If you don’t fish it often, there is an adjustment period.  Go back to your roots, do what you do well and have confidence in.  I do want another shot at deep still water nymphing techniques because the systematic approach works well there too.  I always say that folks should fish to their strengths while working on their weaknesses.  Someday I’ll get back there better armed with information and techniques and flatten out that weakness. It’s all part of the process of becoming a complete angler.  In the meantime, Fear No Water!

Duane

El Tigre on a dry

El Tigre on a dry

Meat eater in the lake

Meat eater in the lake

Gentry in mid-cast

Gentry in mid-cast

Sylvan Lake, Colorado

Sylvan Lake, Colorado